China (Q899)

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a country in Asia
  • Chine
  • People's Republic of China
  • CHN
  • PRC
  • China, People's Republic of
Language Label Description Also known as
English
China
a country in Asia
  • Chine
  • People's Republic of China
  • CHN
  • PRC
  • China, People's Republic of

Statements

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1995
In 1995, "most of China's disabled athletes are amateurs - some work (many in welfare factories through which they have access to organized competitions and team selection); others do not." Emma Victoria Stone
1996
The 1996 Work Programme said that "Popular athletic activities should be organized widely to raise the competitiveness of disabled persons".
1984
In 1984, the Chinese government opened a new chapter in the development of sports and physical culture in Chinese history. The era of disability sports had dawned. Emma Victoria Stone
"and do not know how to compete [jingzheng]. In an era of market competition, strength and the ability to compete and win are prized traits. Hence the suggestion in the 1996 Work Programme that: "Popular athletic activities should be organized widely to raise the competitiveness of disabled persons"" (2/2) Emma Victoria Stone
News reports suggest that large numbers o f the disabled athletes who took part in the FESPIC Games in 1994 had never engaged in sports on a serious, or any, level before being selected for competition. - Emma Victoria Stone
Of the 1994 FESPIC Games, "An article in a Beijing newspaper describes the intensive training o f a women's basketball team, in which it is clear that the majority had never even held a basketball prior to training." - Emma Victoria Stone
"Another objective (in line with those o f the exemplary models studied so far) is to challenge social assumptions about disabled people, particularly the age-old assumption that disability necessarily means weakness [ruo] and that, as a consequence o f weakness, disabled people cannot" (1/2)
"The popularity of disability sports at an individual level is fuelled by the promise of winning national glory in a country which values patriots as much as it values winners. " Emma Victoria Stone