partially sighted football (Q2471)

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a sport
  • b2-b3 football
  • b2-b2 blind football
  • partially sighted football
  • vi football
Language Label Description Also known as
English
partially sighted football
a sport
  • b2-b3 football
  • b2-b2 blind football
  • partially sighted football
  • vi football

Statements

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Deporte inclusivo: aplicaciones reales al fútbol
?Deporte inclusivo: aplicaciones reales al fútbol?
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1990
A sighted guide had also been added behind the opposition goal to direct attacking players on the attacking third of the field, with the goalkeeper directing directing in the defending third and another sighted guide directing in the middle third of the field. These rules were in place as of 2002, and were used in IBSA and FEDC sanctioned competitions. (2j/2j)
2002
Across the sports governed by the IBSA in 2002, football was second, behind athletics and one spot ahead of chess
1990
In the early 1990s, internationally there were requests that the IBSA take over governance of blind football as so far there had been no international coordination to form an independent federation for blind and partially sighted football.
1995
The IBSA finally came on board in 1995, and created the IBSA Football Subcommittee. Their governance leadership resulted in formalized rules for the sport that were internationally recognized. This allowed the sport to grow, not just within countries with strong football traditions but in all countries affiliated with the IBSA.
1935
Moving the game inside during the 1920s, 1930s and 1940s meant fencing the court also took away the need to constantly have throw ins, that also served to slow down the pace of the game. It also allowed the ability to start fixing the positions of guides who directed players on the field.
1990
By the 1990s, the rules had been set with B1 players being all the fielders, while B2 and B3 players were limited to playing goalkeepers. To account for their limited vision, they size of the penalty area was reduced. (1j/2j)
45±0
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In 2002, FEDC saw the benefits of futsal in particular as allowing for continuous rehabilitation that people with vision impairments needs. The game also offers absolute freedom to players on the pitch once the referee blows the whistle. (1l/2l)
Most forms of adapted football do not allow a mix of different disability types. The major exception is wheelchair and powerchair football, which sometimes have players with visual impairments.
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Atherton, Martin, and Jess MacBeth. “Disability and Football.” ''Routledge Handbook of Football Studies'', edited by John Hughson, Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group, 2016, pp. 279–292.
FIFA and its member organizations have tried to work closely with leaders in disability sports and disability football as part of FIFA's Social Responsibility agenda.
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Atherton, Martin, and Jess MacBeth. “Disability and Football.” ''Routledge Handbook of Football Studies'', edited by John Hughson, Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group, 2016, pp. 279–292.
International Sports Organization for the Disabled (ISOD) has been formally recognised by FIFA as one of the governing organizations for various forms of adapted football. They were organizing competitions well before this recoginition.
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Atherton, Martin, and Jess MacBeth. “Disability and Football.” ''Routledge Handbook of Football Studies'', edited by John Hughson, Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group, 2016, pp. 279–292.
The International Paralympic Committee does not govern adapted football. Rather, international adapted football federations are members of the IPC. Part of this independence in governance means these forms of adapted football are charged with governing their own classification systems.
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Peters, Derek M., et al. “Going the Distance: A Tale of Energy, Commitment and Collaboration: Drew Ferguson, Head Coach of Canada's Para Soccer Team.” High Performance Disability Sport Coaching, edited by Geoffery Z. Kohe, Routledge, 2017.
While the period from the early 1990s to the late 2000s saw a massive increase in the amount of scholarly research on high performance coaches, there was no comparable growth in research about Paralympic and disability sport high performance coaches.
1 reference
Peters, Derek M., et al. “Going the Distance: A Tale of Energy, Commitment and Collaboration: Drew Ferguson, Head Coach of Canada's Para Soccer Team.” High Performance Disability Sport Coaching, edited by Geoffery Z. Kohe, Routledge, 2017.
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