5-a-side football (Q2252)

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a sport (item holding page, see specific variant subpages)
  • blind football
  • b1 football
  • five-a-side football
Language Label Description Also known as
English
5-a-side football
a sport (item holding page, see specific variant subpages)
  • blind football
  • b1 football
  • five-a-side football

Statements

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Deporte inclusivo: aplicaciones reales al fútbol
?Deporte inclusivo: aplicaciones reales al fútbol?
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It involves both individual and collective orientation, along with spatial domination and coordination to dribble the ball past opposition, to pass the ball to a teammate and to shoot n goal. The key was not to close individual and collective tactical order in completing these tasks.(2k/2k)
The ball currently used in blind football was developed in Brazil in the early 1980s and has slowly evolved ever since.
In 2001, Spanish forward Alfredo Cuadrado said the most important element to the sport was ball handling, which required the ability to localize both the sound of the ball and rival players at the same time. (1k/2k)
This nascent form of football for the blind involving a ball made of a bell wrapped in plastic was very popular in countries with strong footballing traditions and cultures, especially in Brazil and Spain.
In 2002, FEDC saw the benefits of futsal in particular as allowing for continuous rehabilitation that people with vision impairments needs. The game also offers absolute freedom to players on the pitch once the referee blows the whistle. (1l/2l)
FIFA and its member organizations have tried to work closely with leaders in disability sports and disability football as part of FIFA's Social Responsibility agenda.
1 reference
Atherton, Martin, and Jess MacBeth. “Disability and Football.” ''Routledge Handbook of Football Studies'', edited by John Hughson, Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group, 2016, pp. 279–292.
International Sports Organization for the Disabled (ISOD) has been formally recognised by FIFA as one of the governing organizations for various forms of adapted football. They were organizing competitions well before this recoginition.
1 reference
Atherton, Martin, and Jess MacBeth. “Disability and Football.” ''Routledge Handbook of Football Studies'', edited by John Hughson, Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group, 2016, pp. 279–292.
1950
With the move of the sport indoors by the 1950s, a smaller pitch size, created by virtue of playing indoors, meant the speed of the game increased and the number of players on the field decreased.
2002
By 2002, the field size for blind football had also been set at 20 meters by 40 meters, with 4 fielding players for each side on the court during play. As a result, while there is constant contact with opponents during the game, there was no higher rate of injury than games played under FIFA rules.
1980
The ball currently used in blind football was developed in Brazil in the early 1980s and has slowly evolved ever since.
1990
In the early 1990s, internationally there were requests that the IBSA take over governance of blind football as so far there had been no international coordination to form an independent federation for blind and partially sighted football.
2004
The first goal scored in blind football at the Paralympic Games was made by Brazilian Nilson Silva.
1986
In 1986, the first blind football club competition in the world took place in Spain. This was possible because people with disabilities in Spain had more rights and more respect than in many other parts of the world, and it had a strong footballing culture.
1990
By the 1990s, the rules had been set with B1 players being all the fielders, while B2 and B3 players were limited to playing goalkeepers. To account for their limited vision, they size of the penalty area was reduced. (1j/2j)
1960
During the 1960s and 1970s, some of the balls being used by players used baby rattles affixed to the side of the ball. This did not prove very conducive to playing the sport and was abandoned.
1995
The IBSA finally came on board in 1995, and created the IBSA Football Subcommittee. Their governance leadership resulted in formalized rules for the sport that were internationally recognized. This allowed the sport to grow, not just within countries with strong football traditions but in all countries affiliated with the IBSA.
1935
Moving the game inside during the 1920s, 1930s and 1940s meant fencing the court also took away the need to constantly have throw ins, that also served to slow down the pace of the game. It also allowed the ability to start fixing the positions of guides who directed players on the field.
2002
Across the sports governed by the IBSA in 2002, football was second, behind athletics and one spot ahead of chess
1935
Early in the history of the sport, it became apparent that playing outside created a series of challenges, including players knowing where they were on the pitch, the ball being hard to hear on larger pitches and obstacles on the pitch. Early pioneers of the sport realized this needed to be addressed, and started to do this by playing the sport inside.
1990
A sighted guide had also been added behind the opposition goal to direct attacking players on the attacking third of the field, with the goalkeeper directing directing in the defending third and another sighted guide directing in the middle third of the field. These rules were in place as of 2002, and were used in IBSA and FEDC sanctioned competitions. (2j/2j)
1925
Because there was no formal government for the sport in the 1920s, 30s, 40s, 50s, 60s and 70s, nor specialized equipment for blind sportspeople, many of the rules, fields and team sizes were improvised to suit the situation. The primary goal for these blind football players was to have fun and score goals.
1998
Following the IBSA taking over international governance of the sport, 1998 IBSA Blind Football World Championships in Brazil became the first IPC recognized Blind Football World Championship.
14 January 2014
On January 14, 2014, the IBSA Football Subcommittee published the qualification criteria for the IBSA World Blind Football Championships 2014.
November 2014
In November 2014, Dave Connolly from Social Goal in Australia gave the IBSA an update on the development of blind football in Victoria, Australia.
1995
In 1995, the rules for blind football were formally developed and with that came the sport's official creation, marking the sport as one played informally to one that had the technical governance to bring it fully into the fold of organized disability sport.
1991
1991 Parapan American Games for the Visually Impaired took place in 1991 in Argentina, with blind football appearing on the program for the first time. The competition was not IBSA sanctioned. CENARD organized the tournament, which was won by Brazil who brought the ball they had developed a few years earlier with them. Argentina lost every game they played in the tournament.
1994
By 1994, Brazil was hosting technical courses on blind football that were attended by blind footballers from other countries, including Spaniards and Argentinians. Spaniard Carlos Campos and Brazilian Ramón Souza served as the major drivers towards forming the IBSA Football Subcommittee in this period.
1995
As part of the rules that came into the sport in 1995 included that eye patches and glasses had to be worn. This came out of cheating incidents in Brazil. The regulation around the ball in the 1995 rules also came out of Brazil. The rule for the side of the field to be fenced came out of Spanish blind football traditions.
1994
By 1994, Brazil was hosting technical courses on blind football that were attended by blind footballers from other countries though it is unclear if they included Spaniards though Argentinians did attend.
1996
In 1996, the sport was officially recognized by the IBSA and FIFA, along with the rules for the sport being recognized by both organizations.
unknown value
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10±0
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10±0
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