deaf football (Q2323)

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a sport
  • deaf soccer
Language Label Description Also known as
English
deaf football
a sport
  • deaf soccer

Statements

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Deporte inclusivo: aplicaciones reales al fútbol
?Deporte inclusivo: aplicaciones reales al fútbol?
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The FA National Game Strategy 2011/2012 Report had set a target of 10% of players being female, which was a target that these football variants were not able to meet.
1 reference
Atherton, Martin, and Jess MacBeth. “Disability and Football.” ''Routledge Handbook of Football Studies'', edited by John Hughson, Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group, 2016, pp. 279–292.
International Sports Organization for the Disabled (ISOD) has been formally recognised by FIFA as one of the governing organizations for various forms of adapted football. They were organizing competitions well before this recoginition.
1 reference
Atherton, Martin, and Jess MacBeth. “Disability and Football.” ''Routledge Handbook of Football Studies'', edited by John Hughson, Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group, 2016, pp. 279–292.
Only two forms of football have really embraced gender diversity in play. They are id football governed by Special Olympics, not INAS, and deaf football. This gender imblance often reflects similar imbalances in non-disability football.
1 reference
Atherton, Martin, and Jess MacBeth. “Disability and Football.” ''Routledge Handbook of Football Studies'', edited by John Hughson, Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group, 2016, pp. 279–292.
FIFA and its member organizations have tried to work closely with leaders in disability sports and disability football as part of FIFA's Social Responsibility agenda.
1 reference
Atherton, Martin, and Jess MacBeth. “Disability and Football.” ''Routledge Handbook of Football Studies'', edited by John Hughson, Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group, 2016, pp. 279–292.
2010
Jörg Kratz, Juan Carlos Basilio, Sebastian Calderon and Thomas Kramer attended the first DCL meeting in Amsterdam.
2009
The 2010 edition had a number of places interested in hosting the Deaf Champions League, including Athens and Madrid.
February 2010
The second meeting was held in February 2010 in Madrid, Spain. The Executive DCL Committee was created at this meeting. The first members included Memnos Costi, Mario Costi, Jörg Kratz, Juan Carlos Basilio, Mariano Druetta, Javier Soto, Thomas Krämer and Armin Dorfschmid.
2007
Marios Costi visited Germany in the winter of 2007 to inform Kramer that St Johns DFC had decided to host the “Deaf Champions League” in London in the summer of 2008. He wanted to get support from Kramer and GSG Stuttgart to support this, along with support from other teams on the continent.
2009
Denmark's Globen Sports initially wanted to host the 2009 edition but they were not sure they could pull off the event on such short notice. With no one else volunteering to host, GSG Stuttgart to host an after some deliberation, the team agreed to after they recieved support from Andreas Salzmann.
2009
10 teams would participate in this second edition of the Deaf Champions League.
February 2010
After the February 2010 DCL meeting, attendees visited football fields and stadiums to look at facilities.