amputee football (Q23331)

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a sport
  • amputee soccer
Language Label Description Also known as
English
amputee football
a sport
  • amputee soccer

Statements

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Deporte inclusivo: aplicaciones reales al fútbol
?Deporte inclusivo: aplicaciones reales al fútbol?
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1980
Amputee football was first played in the 1980s in the United States.
1 reference
Atherton, Martin, and Jess MacBeth. “Disability and Football.” ''Routledge Handbook of Football Studies'', edited by John Hughson, Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group, 2016, pp. 279–292.
1997
The 1998 WAFF World Cup was the first time the competition had been played using the 7-a-side format.
1 reference
Centre of Excellence Defence Against Terrorism, editor. Amputee Sports for Victims of Terrorism. IOS Press, 2007.
1997
Following the 1991 WAFF World Cup, the sport stopped international competition for several years while behind the scenes differences in the future of the sport's governance were ironed out. The competition would not return until 1998, after a last minute organizational issue that resulted in Niagara Falls, Canada hosts to pull out weeks before the World Cup was to have started.
1 reference
Centre of Excellence Defence Against Terrorism, editor. Amputee Sports for Victims of Terrorism. IOS Press, 2007.
2005
Sierra Leone made their debut at the WAFF World Cup in 2005, becoming the first African team to participate in the tournament.
1 reference
Centre of Excellence Defence Against Terrorism, editor. Amputee Sports for Victims of Terrorism. IOS Press, 2007.
2005
The purpose of the executive committee elected in 2005 was to modernize the game, and to meet the near professional demands of international standards.
1 reference
Centre of Excellence Defence Against Terrorism, editor. Amputee Sports for Victims of Terrorism. IOS Press, 2007.
2005
The 2005 WAFF World Cup continued a theme from previous World Cups: touchline discpline, on-field discipline and refereeing problems. Again, refereeing caused chaos and again potentially impacted game outcomes.
1 reference
Centre of Excellence Defence Against Terrorism, editor. Amputee Sports for Victims of Terrorism. IOS Press, 2007.
1992
Following the 1991 WAFF World Cup, the sport stopped international competition for several years while behind the scenes differences in the future of the sport's governance were ironed out.
1 reference
Centre of Excellence Defence Against Terrorism, editor. Amputee Sports for Victims of Terrorism. IOS Press, 2007.
2002
The International Amputee Football Federation and political turmoil continued anew at the 2002 WAFF World Cup. The General Assembly held concurrently with the tournament could not be completed. It featured American T. Feller casting a vote for himself that resulted in T. Feller becoming President.
1 reference
Centre of Excellence Defence Against Terrorism, editor. Amputee Sports for Victims of Terrorism. IOS Press, 2007.
2004
Following the 2003 meeting, it was agreed to keep communications open but it resulted in the 2004 tournament not taking place.
1 reference
Centre of Excellence Defence Against Terrorism, editor. Amputee Sports for Victims of Terrorism. IOS Press, 2007.
1983
Around 1983, Bill Barry created Amputee Soccer International. This was the first international amputee football governing body. In this early period, he travveled to El Salvador and Eastern Europe to promote and develop the sport.
1 reference
Centre of Excellence Defence Against Terrorism, editor. Amputee Sports for Victims of Terrorism. IOS Press, 2007.
1995
During the late 1990s, Moldova was only able to participate in tournaments in nearby countries as a result of funding issues.
1 reference
Centre of Excellence Defence Against Terrorism, editor. Amputee Sports for Victims of Terrorism. IOS Press, 2007.
1991
There were issues with the 1991 WAFF World Cup including teams arriving at the tournament, with England and Brazil having to spend the night in the rough at a Moscow airport. Players were also very unhappy with the quality of refereeing.
1 reference
Centre of Excellence Defence Against Terrorism, editor. Amputee Sports for Victims of Terrorism. IOS Press, 2007.
2006
Funding issues in England meant a Great Britain team was entered instead of an English teamm at the 2006 WAFF World Cup.
1 reference
Centre of Excellence Defence Against Terrorism, editor. Amputee Sports for Victims of Terrorism. IOS Press, 2007.
1983
In the early 1980s, there was some resistance to amputee football as the USSR claimed disabilities did not exist in the country.
1 reference
Centre of Excellence Defence Against Terrorism, editor. Amputee Sports for Victims of Terrorism. IOS Press, 2007.
1983
In the early 1980s, most players in El Salvador were former military members who became amputees as a result of war.
1 reference
Centre of Excellence Defence Against Terrorism, editor. Amputee Sports for Victims of Terrorism. IOS Press, 2007.
1990
The WAFF World Cup in 1990 took place in Seattle, with the competition divided into two competitions: an 11-a-side game and a 6-a-side game.
1 reference
Centre of Excellence Defence Against Terrorism, editor. Amputee Sports for Victims of Terrorism. IOS Press, 2007.
2003
The emergency session resulted in the disolution of the International Amputee Football Federation. This was because leadership was viewed as incompetent, owing to lack of knowledge of the game or lack of experience in sports governance.
1 reference
Centre of Excellence Defence Against Terrorism, editor. Amputee Sports for Victims of Terrorism. IOS Press, 2007.
2003
Following the drama at the General Assembly at the 2002 WAFF World Cup, an emergency session was called for during the 2003 WAFF World Cup.
1 reference
Centre of Excellence Defence Against Terrorism, editor. Amputee Sports for Victims of Terrorism. IOS Press, 2007.
2003
The 2002 drama in Sochi also meant only 4 teams participated at the 2003 tournament in Tashkent, Uzbekistan.
1 reference
Centre of Excellence Defence Against Terrorism, editor. Amputee Sports for Victims of Terrorism. IOS Press, 2007.
1998
During the 1998 WAFF World Cup, www.ampsoccer.org was founded by American Rick Hofmann. The website played an important role in recording the history of the sport, and keeping track of amputee football records.
1 reference
Centre of Excellence Defence Against Terrorism, editor. Amputee Sports for Victims of Terrorism. IOS Press, 2007.
2003
The 2003 WAFF World Cup itself had problems, specifically with refereeing, and questionable calls potentially impacting the outcome of games. There was also a fair amount of touchline indiscipline.
1 reference
Centre of Excellence Defence Against Terrorism, editor. Amputee Sports for Victims of Terrorism. IOS Press, 2007.
1997
While the early history of the sport was about recreational entertainment and rehabilitation, by the late 1990s the sport had progressed and become more about serious, elite competition.
1 reference
Centre of Excellence Defence Against Terrorism, editor. Amputee Sports for Victims of Terrorism. IOS Press, 2007.
1991
During the 1990s, political tensions inside the sports governance system briefly led to the suspension of the WAFF World Cup. This necessitated a revival of the sport.
1 reference
Centre of Excellence Defence Against Terrorism, editor. Amputee Sports for Victims of Terrorism. IOS Press, 2007.
2005
Following the dissoultion of the International Amputee Football Federation in the 2003 to 2004 period, the 2005 WAFF World Cup saw the creation of the World Amputee Football Federation. A General Assembly was held and an executive committee was elected.
1 reference
Centre of Excellence Defence Against Terrorism, editor. Amputee Sports for Victims of Terrorism. IOS Press, 2007.
1995
Because of the turmoil created by the political situation in the late 1980s, amputee football stagnated and almost completely disappeared in Canada, El Salvador and the United States by the late 1990s.
1 reference
Centre of Excellence Defence Against Terrorism, editor. Amputee Sports for Victims of Terrorism. IOS Press, 2007.
2002
As of 2002, international matches for amputee football was a 7-a-side game, with goals being 2x5 meters large. This international standardization ended up requiring a change in tactics from an 11-a-side game that was previously played.
1 reference
Centre of Excellence Defence Against Terrorism, editor. Amputee Sports for Victims of Terrorism. IOS Press, 2007.
April 1988
Bill Barry visited Stoke Mandeville in the spring of 1988 to participate in an multi-sport training weekend that was organized by British Amputees. This contact resulted in England playing in the 1988 WAFF World Cup in Seattle.
1 reference
Centre of Excellence Defence Against Terrorism, editor. Amputee Sports for Victims of Terrorism. IOS Press, 2007.
2003
Sierra Leone's national team did a short tour of England in 2003.
1 reference
Centre of Excellence Defence Against Terrorism, editor. Amputee Sports for Victims of Terrorism. IOS Press, 2007.
1991
The 1991 WAFF World Cup was the first time the tournament was held outside Seattle, Washington. The competition was held in Tashkent, Uzbekistan.
1 reference
Centre of Excellence Defence Against Terrorism, editor. Amputee Sports for Victims of Terrorism. IOS Press, 2007.
1998
In 1998, Rick Hofmann created the influential amputee football website ampsoccer.org.
1 reference
Centre of Excellence Defence Against Terrorism, editor. Amputee Sports for Victims of Terrorism. IOS Press, 2007.
December 1998
Russia, England, Ukraine and the United States had representatives meet in Moscow in December 1998 with the purpose of creating the International Amputee Football Federation, replacing Amputee Soccer International.
1 reference
Centre of Excellence Defence Against Terrorism, editor. Amputee Sports for Victims of Terrorism. IOS Press, 2007.
1998
The 1998 WAFF World Cup marked the third version of the tournament as a new international federation took over control of it.
November 2001
Americans questioned the worthiness of the Brazilian victory at the 2001 WAFF World Cup given what they saw as massive home team bias. Luis Felix, head referee for the Brazilian Amputee Soccer Organization, appointed himself the head referee for every match Brazil played in the tournament, including Brazil's semifinal. (1L/3L)
1998
In the period between 1998 and 2001, Brazil and Russia were the two most dominant teams in the world. They led international tournaments in total goals scored and fewest goals allowed. Russia won the 1998 WAFF World Cup, while Brazil won the 1999 and 2000 editions.
November 2001
The only reason he was not head referee for the final was a heated pre-match discussion that saw him eventually accept being the second. ournament rules also said that teams shall have a maximum number of 15 players. During at least one game, Brazil was photographed with 10 players on the bench, putting their team at 17. (2L/3L)
November 2001
That was 2 more than allowed after the 7 onfield players were counted. The Americans criticized IAFF President Georgy Lunarcharsky for witnessing these incidents but doing nothing to preserve the integrity of the tournament. (3L/3L)
1982
From the beginning of the sport's history, goalkeepers have been amputees who are missing arms or hands. Upper limb amputee goalies are also the only players who can touch the ball with an arm or hand.
1991
The 1991 WAFF World Cup becomes the first WAFF World Cup to be held outside North America. The competition took place in Tashkent, Uzbekistan
2009
A World Cup was supposed to take place in Nova Friburgo, Brazil but the host city reneged on their hosting commitment. This led to the cancellation of the event.
2000
The 2000 World Cup tournament was almost canceled because of funding issues. Private sponsors were hard to find. It only took place because of a last minute grant from the U.S. Soccer Foundation.
International Sports Organization for the Disabled (ISOD) has been formally recognised by FIFA as one of the governing organizations for various forms of adapted football. They were organizing competitions well before this recoginition.
1 reference
Atherton, Martin, and Jess MacBeth. “Disability and Football.” ''Routledge Handbook of Football Studies'', edited by John Hughson, Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group, 2016, pp. 279–292.
FIFA and its member organizations have tried to work closely with leaders in disability sports and disability football as part of FIFA's Social Responsibility agenda.
1 reference
Atherton, Martin, and Jess MacBeth. “Disability and Football.” ''Routledge Handbook of Football Studies'', edited by John Hughson, Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group, 2016, pp. 279–292.
Jose Melgar Maravilla was so well known in the early 1980s for being a great amputee football player that he appeared on an El Salvadorian postage stamp.
1 reference
Centre of Excellence Defence Against Terrorism, editor. Amputee Sports for Victims of Terrorism. IOS Press, 2007.
While the period from the early 1990s to the late 2000s saw a massive increase in the amount of scholarly research on high performance coaches, there was no comparable growth in research about Paralympic and disability sport high performance coaches.
1 reference
Peters, Derek M., et al. “Going the Distance: A Tale of Energy, Commitment and Collaboration: Drew Ferguson, Head Coach of Canada's Para Soccer Team.” High Performance Disability Sport Coaching, edited by Geoffery Z. Kohe, Routledge, 2017.
The International Paralympic Committee does not govern adapted football. Rather, international adapted football federations are members of the IPC. Part of this independence in governance means these forms of adapted football are charged with governing their own classification systems.
1 reference
Peters, Derek M., et al. “Going the Distance: A Tale of Energy, Commitment and Collaboration: Drew Ferguson, Head Coach of Canada's Para Soccer Team.” High Performance Disability Sport Coaching, edited by Geoffery Z. Kohe, Routledge, 2017.
amputee football was created by accident.