1992 Summer Paralympics Madrid (Q1595)

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1992 Paralympic Games for ID athletes held separately in Madrid. Counted for ID sportspeople as first Games even if not in Barcelona.
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English
1992 Summer Paralympics Madrid
1992 Paralympic Games for ID athletes held separately in Madrid. Counted for ID sportspeople as first Games even if not in Barcelona.

    Statements

    "Britain’s 5-a-side football quarter final against host nation and tournament favourites Spain was mired in controversy with five players being booked, one being sent off and the match lasting a total of two hours and twelve minutes. " -- paralympicanorak
    "British Coach David Agnew wrote to the organising committee after the game to complain about the standard of officiating at the game and demanding to know why the clock had been stopped every time the ball went out of play, which had not happened in any of their previous games." -- paralympicanorak
    "With Spain leading 2-0 Britain had defender David Haston sent off for a second bookable offence, but still managed to fight back and win 9-8. " -- paralympicanorak
    In the table tennis George Zlat of Romania in the men’s events and Zhan Luo of China in the women’s events both went home with three gold medals from the singles, doubles and team events at the 1992 Pgames Madrid.
    Sigrun Huld of Iceland took five individual and four relay gold medals at the 1992 PGames Madrid.
    At the 1992 Paralympics Madrid, Britain’s 5-a-side football quarter final against host nation and tournament favourites Spain was mired in controversy with five players being booked, one being sent off and the match lasting a total of two hours and twelve minutes. (1C/3C)
    A total of seventy-five nations from all five continents gathered in Madrid for the 1992 Games to compete in sixty-eight events spread over five sports. The countries with the largest teams were Great Britain (92), Spain (88), Poland (68), France (61), Brazil (58), Australia (52) and Japan (52) and those with the smallest teams were Estonia (3), Peru, Namibia (1) and Curaçao.
    On the track Lorena Milichi of Uruguay also won three gold medals from the 400m, high jump and 4 x 100m relay. She also took silver in the 100m and bronze in the 200m at the 1992 PGames Madrid.
    The 1992 Games in Madrid also appear to have been partly hit by the fact the Special Olympics were due to be holding games in Barcelona that year. This appears to have caused some conflict, at least at the national level, in some countries as to which event they should attend.
    With Spain leading 2-0 Britain had defender David Haston sent off for a second bookable offence, but still managed to fight back and win 9-8. (2C/3C)
    Deputy Team Manager of the British team, Hywel Evans, is reported in the Caernarvan and Denbigh Herald as stating that the food in 1992 PGames Madrid was terrible and that they had spent nearly £3,000 on food supplements for the team. He claims that he himself lived on sultanas, bananas, peaches and cold McDonald’s for the fortnight they were there.
    British Coach David Agnew wrote to the organising committee after the game to complain about the standard of officiating at the game and demanding to know why the clock had been stopped every time the ball went out of play, which had not happened in any of their previous games. (3C/3C)
    The first three athletes with an intellectual disability to win medals in the history of the Paralympic Games were Joseph Walker (AUS) (Gold), Damian Huber (ARG) (Silver) and Joshua Hoffer (AUS) (Bronze) in the men’s 200m freestyle swimming. The medals were presented by Jerry Wolsh and Wim Zonneveld, honorary members of INAS-FMH.
    The Australian men’s swimming team was totally dominant in the pool at the 1992 PGames Madrid, with Joseph Walker being the undoubted star winning nine gold medals (five individual, 4 relay) from nine events and setting two world records.