1996 Summer Paralympics (Q1562)

From Parasports
Jump to: navigation, search
Paralympic Games cycle
  • 1996 Paralympic Games
  • 1996PSG
  • 1996 Summer Paralympics
Language Label Description Also known as
English
1996 Summer Paralympics
Paralympic Games cycle
  • 1996 Paralympic Games
  • 1996PSG
  • 1996 Summer Paralympics

Statements

"Organisers of the Atlanta Paralympic Games had to pay $1million to get the Games broadcast on American television. This is in stark contrast to the $456million paid to the organisers of the Atlanta Olympic Games by NBC for the rights to broadcast them on American television." -- paralympicanorak
The Iraqi wheelchair basketball team, who were to be their country’s sole competitors at the Games, failed to arrive in Atlanta despite being expected right up until the last minute. (1D/2D)
In order to keep costs down the Paralympic Organising Committee used a wide range of public and private facilities spread around the city to host the different sports which in many ways added to the transportation problems that had plagued the city during the Olympic Games.
Many of the problems that occurred in the Paralympic village appear to stem from the actions of the Olympic Organising Committee who failed to carry out agreed handover procedures (including cleaning) and apparently went around ripping out appliances, plug sockets from walls and generally leaving the village in a total mess.
At the 1996 PGames, Noel Thatcher won gold medals in the B2 5k and 10k track races for visually impaired athletes despite having a stress fracture in his left shin. He was hoping to emulate his Olympic hero Parvo Nurmi by also winning the gold medal in the marathon, but was forced to withdraw from the marathon when doctors warned him that he risked breaking his shin bone if he went ahead.
Atlanta appears to be another host city where no real historical archive of the Games was saved.
The Atalanta Olympic Organizers were two days late handing the village over further adding to the Paralympic Organising Committee’s problems.
One area of criticism for APOC was their handling of the 56 Intellectually Disabled athletes competing in the Games for the first time. No mention was made of them in any of the material produced to advertise the Games even when explaining classification.
The Paralympic village, which was the target of numerous complaints by participating delegations regarding the state of the rooms, the food, the transportation and many other aspects.
It is claimed that this was due to a lack of available hard currency to pay for the expenses of the team whilst in Atlanta due to the sanctions in place that prevented Iraq selling their oil following their invasion of Kuwait, but it may have been due to the fact that their very first Games was due to be against the USA. (2D/2D)
Many of the behind the scenes organisational problems in Atlanta appear to have their roots in the refusal of the Atlanta Olympic Organising Committee to have anything to do with the organisation of the Paralympic Games.
One important first from Atlanta, as had happened with the Olympic Games back in 1984 in Los Angeles, was that for the first time a corporate sponsorship programme was launched that marketed the Games as a commercially viable event.
Live coverage of the Paralympics was all but impossible in 11 out of the 14 sporting venues in Atlanta as only one camera and crew was available at each. Only athletics, swimming and Basketball had sufficient cameras to provide live coverage.
A relatively indifferent attitude by the Olympic Organising Committee in Atlanta towards the Paralympic Games, especially during the Olympic/ Paralympic Games transition period lead to a wide number of problems.
Despite repeated official complaints to APOC management by Bernard Athos, President of INAS-FMH APOC officials refused to respond, until Athos went to the Atlanta press with his grievances. Once the Atlanta newspapers took up the story APOC apparently immediately apologised for their unintended oversight.
Worse still, id sportspeople were not even mentioned or introduced at the opening ceremony at the 1996 Summer Paralympics
Organisers of the Atlanta Paralympic Games had to pay$1million to get the Games broadcast on American television. This is in stark contrast to the $456million paid to the organisers of the Atlanta Olympic Games by NBC for the rights to broadcast them on American television.
An athlete protested over the issues related to the accessibility of the Games accomodation. This protest was absent any greater context of disability rights, but based only on Games specific disability issues.